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Email:   i  nfo@sbmlt.net                                                                                                           San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust                                                                              501(3)(C) non-profit organization                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Tax ID# 33-0700417                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

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Enough Water for Eagle Ridge?

Thursday, March 9, 2006

During the March 3 Crestline-Lake Arrowhead Water Agency board of directors meeting, General Manager Roxanne Holmes told board members Eagle Ridge at Arrowhead developer Rob Roy had requested construction water for his project on Grass Valley Road. Holmes said when Roy applied to the county for his project in 1998, he listed Alpine Water District and/or CLAWA as water service providers for the project. However, she said, when she asked Roy why he didn't approach Alpine for the water, he told her he was told by Alpine officials they didn't have sufficient water. His property does lie within CLAWA's district boundaries.

As the wholesaler for the state water project water, CLAWA's policy is not to compete with the mountaintop water agencies they sell water to. Holmes told Roy to get a signed letter from Alpine Water Company's management stating they cannot supply him with construction water. If and when such a letter is presented, she said management and the board could then consider the request. If they supply water to Roy, he will have to pay for the water as well as a fee for utilizing the hydrant. Holmes feels the agency would have sufficient water to sell to him if the need arises and they would still be able to service all their regular customers. She also said it would be “good revenue” for CLAWA but she was “conflicted over the issues.”

Holmes said at the time Roy filed with the county, CLAWA gave him a “Will Serve” letter. She added that she believes Roy would not use more than 12 acre-feet over a six- to eight-week time frame. Following the meeting she told The Mountain News, “Alpine Water District is the natural service entity for this project. While we feel we would have the water to serve the construction needs, it would make sense to sell the additional water to Alpine Water District and then they could make their own arrangement with Rob Roy. We are in the business of selling water but Alpine does have a connection with the agency with no imposed water limit at this time.”

Board member Tom Sutton questioned if Alpine Water doesn't have the water to supply Roy for construction, will they have the available water to service the entire project when all the homes and infrastructure are constructed. He said if CLAWA ends up supplying the construction water they would basically become the retailer if Alpine refuses to serve the construction project.

Peter Jorris, who attended the meeting on behalf of the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust, reminded directors the Eagle Ridge development was “the most controversial project in Lake Arrowhead” and there were over 6,000 residents who signed petitions against the development. After lengthy hearings the project was approved by the board of supervisors.

The first phase of Eagle Ridge at Arrowhead is located along Grass Valley Road across from the 17th fairway at the Lake Arrowhead Country Club. The first phase will include construction of 40 detached two- to three-story homes.

STANDBY CHARGES APPROVED

The annual standby charges property owners pay to the Crestline-Lake Arrowhead Water Agency (CLAWA) will remain the same as last year as the result of a Feb. 2 decision by CLAWA's board of directors. Owners of parcels up to one acre will continue to pay $30 per year and those who own more than one acre will pay $30 plus a partial fee for “additional portions of an acre.” CLAWA's General Manager Roxanne Holmes said she expects assessments this year will total $925,940.

DRAFT URBAN

WATER PLAN

The 2005 draft urban water plan is ready for public review and comment at CLAWA's district office at 24116 Crest Forest Road in Crestline. Following a mandatory 30-day pubic review period, board members will discuss and perhaps adopt the plan during their April 6 board meeting. Public comments must be addressed to the staff in writing. Internet users can review the plan by logging onto: www.clawa.org.

The purpose of the plan is to address CLAWA's long-term needs and policies concerning water supply, demand, conservation and reclamation and reuse. The intended benefits of the plan include helping assure a reliable water supply, promoting the wise and efficient use of water, to plan ahead for periods of water shortage and to encourage the use of recycled water.http://www.mountain-news.com/news/localnews/article_9be23091-fb93-5a02-b828-0c0744d9a943.html  

http://www.mountain-news.com/news/localnews/article_9be23091-fb93-5a02-b828-0c0744d9a943.html 

http://www.mountain-news.com/news/localnews/article_9be23091-fb93-5a02-b828-0c0744d9a943.html 

osted: Thursday, March 9, 2006 12:00 am

During the March 3 Crestline-Lake Arrowhead Water Agency board of directors meeting, General Manager Roxanne Holmes told board members Eagle Ridge at Arrowhead developer Rob Roy had requested construction water for his project on Grass Valley Road. Holmes said when Roy applied to the county for his project in 1998, he listed Alpine Water District and/or CLAWA as water service providers for the project. However, she said, when she asked Roy why he didn't approach Alpine for the water, he told her he was told by Alpine officials they didn't have sufficient water. His property does lie within CLAWA's district boundaries.

As the wholesaler for the state water project water, CLAWA's policy is not to compete with the mountaintop water agencies they sell water to. Holmes told Roy to get a signed letter from Alpine Water Company's management stating they cannot supply him with construction water. If and when such a letter is presented, she said management and the board could then consider the request. If they supply water to Roy, he will have to pay for the water as well as a fee for utilizing the hydrant. Holmes feels the agency would have sufficient water to sell to him if the need arises and they would still be able to service all their regular customers. She also said it would be “good revenue” for CLAWA but she was “conflicted over the issues.”

 

Holmes said at the time Roy filed with the county, CLAWA gave him a “Will Serve” letter. She added that she believes Roy would not use more than 12 acre-feet over a six- to eight-week time frame. Following the meeting she told The Mountain News, “Alpine Water District is the natural service entity for this project. While we feel we would have the water to serve the construction needs, it would make sense to sell the additional water to Alpine Water District and then they could make their own arrangement with Rob Roy. We are in the business of selling water but Alpine does have a connection with the agency with no imposed water limit at this time.”

Board member Tom Sutton questioned if Alpine Water doesn't have the water to supply Roy for construction, will they have the available water to service the entire project when all the homes and infrastructure are constructed. He said if CLAWA ends up supplying the construction water they would basically become the retailer if Alpine refuses to serve the construction project.

Peter Jorris, who attended the meeting on behalf of the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust, reminded directors the Eagle Ridge development was “the most controversial project in Lake Arrowhead” and there were over 6,000 residents who signed petitions against the development. After lengthy hearings the project was approved by the board of supervisors.

The first phase of Eagle Ridge at Arrowhead is located along Grass Valley Road across from the 17th fairway at the Lake Arrowhead Country Club. The first phase will include construction of 40 detached two- to three-story homes.

STANDBY CHARGES APPROVED

The annual standby charges property owners pay to the Crestline-Lake Arrowhead Water Agency (CLAWA) will remain the same as last year as the result of a Feb. 2 decision by CLAWA's board of directors. Owners of parcels up to one acre will continue to pay $30 per year and those who own more than one acre will pay $30 plus a partial fee for “additional portions of an acre.” CLAWA's General Manager Roxanne Holmes said she expects assessments this year will total $925,940.

DRAFT URBAN

WATER PLAN

The 2005 draft urban water plan is ready for public review and comment at CLAWA's district office at 24116 Crest Forest Road in Crestline. Following a mandatory 30-day pubic review period, board members will discuss and perhaps adopt the plan during their April 6 board meeting. Public comments must be addressed to the staff in writing. Internet users can review the plan by logging onto: www.clawa.org.

The purpose of the plan is to address CLAWA's long-term needs and policies concerning water supply, demand, conservation and reclamation and reuse. The intended benefits of the plan include helping assure a reliable water supply, promoting the wise and efficient use of water, to plan ahead for periods of water shortage and to encourage the use of recycled water.