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Email:   i  nfo@sbmlt.net                                                                                                           San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust                                                                              501(3)(C) non-profit organization                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Tax ID# 33-0700417                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

 

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Thinning Slated for Eagle Ridge

Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:38 am

 

One reason the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust entered into a conservation purchase of an 80-acre portion of the Eagle Ridge property in Lake Arrowhead was the outstanding vigor and beauty of the forest found on the property.

It is recognized to be the most outstanding example of a classic southern Sierran native forest that can be found in the San Bernardino Mountains. The stature and health of the magnificent trees, combined with the diversity of age and proportionate mix of native conifers and oaks, add up to the best of its kind on the mountain, a model of our forest's proud heritage.

"It is also the last remaining open space in the crowded Lake Arrowhead community," said Kevin Kellems, projects manager for the Land Trust. "We have a responsibility to make sure that it is managed for optimum health as well as fire safety."

With the Land Trust's approval, a County of San Bernardino Hazardous Tree Removal contract has been awarded to SCS Timber Resources, a local company formerly based in Oregon and now working out of Running Springs.

Representatives of the Land Trust have made three tours of the property in advance of the project's commencement, which is scheduled to start about the first week in November. The first inspection was led by the Land Trust's forestry advisor, Jim Asher, whose knowledge about this specific site goes back over 40 years.

A second tour was made along with county foresters, Frank Losekoot and Elliott Graham, who explained the basis for the various marked trees and pointed out particular areas where the health of the forest would benefit from the thinning of excess hazardous fuels. The county foresters and Asher were in agreement about the overall advantages of a low-impact mechanical treatment being proposed for the area.

The project involves the removal of mostly dead trees, thickets of underbrush and lower limbs. It is a clearing project that is designed to promote forest health while reducing the potential risk of wildfire.

A third tour was made with the project contractor, Stephen Stockley of SCS Timber Resources, and Roseanne Sconce, the company's administrative manager. During this final tour, specific methods of removal and types of equipment to be used were discussed.

At the last meeting of the Arrowhead Communities Fire Safe Council, Chris Danyow, contract compliance officer with the county's Hazardous Tree Removal program, said the project "should be a good one.

"It's real visible," he noted, adding they plan to leave a screen near the road.

"When people hear chainsaws on the site, we would like them to be aware that this is a well thought-out program designed for the health of the forest and the overall safety of the public," said Kellems. 

 

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Posted: Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:38 am

One reason the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust entered into a conservation purchase of an 80-acre portion of the Eagle Ridge property in Lake Arrowhead was the outstanding vigor and beauty of the forest found on the property.

It is recognized to be the most outstanding example of a classic southern Sierran native forest that can be found in the San Bernardino Mountains. The stature and health of the magnificent trees, combined with the diversity of age and proportionate mix of native conifers and oaks, add up to the best of its kind on the mountain, a model of our forest's proud heritage.

"It is also the last remaining open space in the crowded Lake Arrowhead community," said Kevin Kellems, projects manager for the Land Trust. "We have a responsibility to make sure that it is managed for optimum health as well as fire safety."

With the Land Trust's approval, a County of San Bernardino Hazardous Tree Removal contract has been awarded to SCS Timber Resources, a local company formerly based in Oregon and now working out of Running Springs.

Representatives of the Land Trust have made three tours of the property in advance of the project's commencement, which is scheduled to start about the first week in November. The first inspection was led by the Land Trust's forestry advisor, Jim Asher, whose knowledge about this specific site goes back over 40 years.

A second tour was made along with county foresters, Frank Losekoot and Elliott Graham, who explained the basis for the various marked trees and pointed out particular areas where the health of the forest would benefit from the thinning of excess hazardous fuels. The county foresters and Asher were in agreement about the overall advantages of a low-impact mechanical treatment being proposed for the area.

The project involves the removal of mostly dead trees, thickets of underbrush and lower limbs. It is a clearing project that is designed to promote forest health while reducing the potential risk of wildfire.

A third tour was made with the project contractor, Stephen Stockley of SCS Timber Resources, and Roseanne Sconce, the company's administrative manager. During this final tour, specific methods of removal and types of equipment to be used were discussed.

At the last meeting of the Arrowhead Communities Fire Safe Council, Chris Danyow, contract compliance officer with the county's Hazardous Tree Removal program, said the project "should be a good one.

"It's real visible," he noted, adding they plan to leave a screen near the road.

"When people hear chainsaws on the site, we would like them to be aware that this is a well thought-out program designed for the health of the forest and the overall safety of the public," said Kellems.